Slow Down, You Crazy Child

"I'm still in the commonwealth stage of my life/ wondering what to decide, what to conclude/what to declare myself."- Tato Laviera

sassysinglelady:

What was the original purpose for this website because something went wrong along the way

(via galadreel)

(Source: n-a-blue-box, via pintodeans)

love-portlandia:

Portlandia season 4 episode 4

love-portlandia:

Portlandia season 4 episode 4

belowtheprecipice:

cosmographia:

thepap64experience:

Mulan: The only Disney Princess with a body count… in the thousands

I yell this to anybody who misses in anything. 

a body count… in the thousands

(Source: garfizzle, via ileftmyheartindisney)

theatlantic:

Passover, the Jewish Holiday for Gentiles

Passover is a festival of questions, many of which can be summed up by the single query: “Why is this night different from all other nights?” Here’s one answer: It’s the Jewish festival that non-Jews love to observe.
The seder, the ceremonial feast held on the first two nights of Passover, is one of the most intricate rituals in the Jewish calendar, kicking off an eight-day stretch of complicated and demanding dietary restrictions. The initial meal, which ranges from eating bitter herbs to reciting Talmudic passages in a foreign language, usually lasts for several hours—and dinner isn’t served until more than halfway through.
The festival commemorates the exodus from Egypt, a key step in the formation of the Jewish people. The seder is not just a retelling of the story, like the weekly Torah readings in synagogue; it’s an invitation for Jews to relive the liberation from slavery as if they had actually been there in Egypt, to teach the narrative to the next generation, and to claim the history of their people as part of their own individual identities. In other words, Passover does not seem like the most obvious festival for outsider participation.
And yet every spring, non-kosher restaurants, churches and student organizations around the U.S.—not to mention Jewish homes—invite non-Jews to relive the Israelites’ exodus from bondage. Even the White House has held a seder since 2008. What is it about Passover that speaks to non-Jews and entices them to participate in what is, at least in its traditional format, a multi-hour Hebrew service over a meal with no bread? Surely an option like the recent festival of Purim—where the law stipulates dressing in costume, swapping food baskets and drinking to oblivion—would be a more appealing choice?
Read more. [Image: Pete Souza/Reuters]

theatlantic:

Passover, the Jewish Holiday for Gentiles

Passover is a festival of questions, many of which can be summed up by the single query: “Why is this night different from all other nights?” Here’s one answer: It’s the Jewish festival that non-Jews love to observe.

The seder, the ceremonial feast held on the first two nights of Passover, is one of the most intricate rituals in the Jewish calendar, kicking off an eight-day stretch of complicated and demanding dietary restrictions. The initial meal, which ranges from eating bitter herbs to reciting Talmudic passages in a foreign language, usually lasts for several hours—and dinner isn’t served until more than halfway through.

The festival commemorates the exodus from Egypt, a key step in the formation of the Jewish people. The seder is not just a retelling of the story, like the weekly Torah readings in synagogue; it’s an invitation for Jews to relive the liberation from slavery as if they had actually been there in Egypt, to teach the narrative to the next generation, and to claim the history of their people as part of their own individual identities. In other words, Passover does not seem like the most obvious festival for outsider participation.

And yet every spring, non-kosher restaurants, churches and student organizations around the U.S.—not to mention Jewish homes—invite non-Jews to relive the Israelites’ exodus from bondage. Even the White House has held a seder since 2008. What is it about Passover that speaks to non-Jews and entices them to participate in what is, at least in its traditional format, a multi-hour Hebrew service over a meal with no bread? Surely an option like the recent festival of Purim—where the law stipulates dressing in costume, swapping food baskets and drinking to oblivion—would be a more appealing choice?

Read more. [Image: Pete Souza/Reuters]

(Source: amy-box, via hooopers)

hokeyfright:

The Philadelphia Phillies used children’s drawings of the starting lineup on the scoreboard in place of their official photos. [deadspin]

(via tastefullyoffensive)

bassfanimation:

emmyjeanb:

thesociopathologist:

katemill99:

This should always be on my dash!

…can I just cry about how he keeps looking at her after he releases her? Because you’d think he would just walk away, whatever, emotions whatever. But NO. HE FUCKING STARES AT HER LIKE “I WILL RETURN FOR YOU, MY WOMAN, AND WE WILL FRICKLE FRACKLE. MY DING DANG DIDDLY DOO WILL BE IN YOUR ANGEL HAIR PASTA SOON BBY.”

(Source: mrs-zefron, via hooopers)